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Poetry

Enough

Mama always introduced her world of creations with an
“I hope it’s okay”
or an apology
Lingering question marks after every
“really?”
“are you sure?”

Apologies without reason,
Fear of disappointment when we never were

Ripping out stitch after stitch
Waiting for perfection to come and never leave
Like he did, like they did

She told me I was enough,
enough to overflowing
But she couldn’t say the same for herself
Burdened by the weight of men
who tried to make her less to feel like more
Failing to hold her down for good
but succeeding in tainting her self-love

Everything was/is always beautiful
Nourishing hands present in every bite
every stitch
every embrace

Perfection never came
but she never left

Like this post? View similar content here: The Perfect Answer

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by sar_heik

Sarah Heikkinen is a Troy, NY-based grant writer, freelance journalist and designer, aspiring critic, and hypocritical vegan. After getting a B.A. in English Literature with a minor in Africana & Latino Studies at SUNY Oneonta, Sarah applied to the the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications at Syracuse University (spoiler: she got in). After a long year of writing, rewriting, and crying, Sarah received her Master's in Magazine, Newspaper and Online Journalism in June of 2017.

Now that she's officially finished her formal education (fingers crossed), Sarah's living and working as a freelance writer and editor in Troy, NY. Her interests include poetry, writing personal essays in lieu of finding a therapist, writing about (and occasionally performing) music, dismantling the white patriarchy, and curating only the finest memes on the interweb on her Instagram and Twitter. She also has high hopes of one day writing a book, the first and last chapters of which she's already written - now, she just needs to find the middle.


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